The Best Hammer in 2021
We are reader supported. External links may earn us a commission.

The Best Hammer in 2021

Of all the tools needed in a toolbox or toolkit, a hammer is the most essential. The versatility and usefulness of this classic piece of equipment can’t be overstated. If you don’t have a quality hammer, there isn’t much you can do in the way of work. Being able to reach for a hammer that you can rely on will make any job easier and more enjoyable.

In this article, we have laid out some of the best hammers available on the market. You may not realize that there is such a wide variety of different hammers, and many of them are specially designed for certain types of jobs. Knowing what they are can help you make the right purchase decision.

Backyard Boss Best Hammers in 2021

PRODUCT FEATURES
Edward Tools Oak Claw Hammer 16 oz - The Best Hammer in 2021Edward Tools Oak Claw Hammer 16 oz
  • Color: Natural
  • Material: Oak
  • Weight: 1 pound
Check The Price!
CRAFTSMAN Hammer, Fiberglass, 16 oz. - The Best Hammer in 2021CRAFTSMAN Hammer, Fiberglass, 16 oz.
  • Color: Red
  • Material: Fiberglass
  • Weight: 1 pound
Check The Price!
Stiletto Ti12SC-16 Ti 12-Ounce Smooth Face Hammer - The Best Hammer in 2021Stiletto Ti12SC-16 Ti 12-Ounce Smooth Face Hammer
  • Color: Natural
  • Material: Hickory
  • Weight: 12 ounces
Check The Price!
16 OZ Claw Hammer by HEIKIO - The Best Hammer in 202116 OZ Claw Hammer by HEIKIO
  • Color: Yellow
  • Material: Steel
  • Weight: 1 pound
Check The Price!
8-oz. Stubby Claw Hammer with Magnetic Nail Starter - The Best Hammer in 20218-oz. Stubby Claw Hammer with Magnetic Nail Starter
  • Color: Yellow
  • Material: Alloy Steel
  • Weight: 8 ounces
Check The Price!

Why You Can Trust Us

In all my woodworking years and DIY projects, I can safely say that I have used a hammer more than any other tool. I have also bought a fair share of hammers and have possibly owned dozens of them in my lifetime. Because of that, I have a good grasp of what to look for in a new hammer. I also know the types of jobs that you can do using different varieties of hammers.

It helped me to find some of the most useful and specialized tools on the market. Sharing this information with you is a great way to pass on some of the things I have learned during this time. Thanks to the work I’ve done, you can now easily choose the most suitable tool for your needs on that list.

Best Hammer with Wooden Handle

Edward Tools Oak Claw Hammer 16 oz
    This hammer has a classic style and is designed to last a long time and be effective for years

      Pros:

      Cons:

Why We Like It: The Edward Tools Oak Claw Hammer is a standard classic that is hard to beat when it comes to time-tested design. 

This claw hammer has a forged carbon steel head for some of the most accurate and heavy-hitting work. It features etching on the handle designed to help promote grip and make this hammer easier to use.

The handle itself is made of solid oak and features a contoured design that helps reduce vibrations so you can use it for longer without wearing out your hand. Oak is one of the hardest woods out there, so you can be sure that you won’t snap a handle in the middle of the workday, which can put a damper on the entire job. Plus, all Edward Tools products are guaranteed, meaning you can get a replacement if the hammer breaks.

Who Should Buy It: It’s a great choice for people who want a well-made product with a classic design but don’t need any extra bells and whistles with their tools.

Best Hammer with Fiberglass Handle

CRAFTSMAN Hammer, Fiberglass, 16 oz.
    This fiberglass handled hammer features a rubber grip for excellent vibration absorption

      Pros:

      Cons:

Why We Like It: When it comes to lightweight, easy to maneuver hammers, the CRAFTSMAN Fiberglass Hammer could be a great option. 

At just over 1 pound, this is a hammer meant for everyone to use and is just as strong as some wood-handled counterparts. Plus, you get the prestige of the Craftsman name, which is worth every penny.

This hammer features overstrike protection to keep you from hitting nails too hard and potentially breaking the handle. It has an over-mold grip, which is perfect for keeping this hammer under control while it is in use. It also makes it more comfortable to swing and reduces shock vibrations when it hits the target.

Who Should Buy It: People who want a lightweight option for their hammer and don’t want to waste their money by purchasing something that will break easily will benefit from having it.

Best Titanium Hammer

Stiletto Ti12SC-16 Ti 12-Ounce Smooth Face Hammer
    This titanium hammer is as strong and durable as it gets with a hickory handle and magnetic nail holder

      Pros:

      Cons:

Why We Like It: For some of the best durability available on the market, the Stiletto Ti12SC-16 Ti 12-Ounce Smooth Face Hammer is a great option. 

With a titanium head designed to take a tremendous amount of abuse, this is a perfect choice if you need something that will last you for years and years of heavy-duty hammering. The handle is also made of solid hickory, which absorbs vibrations and keeps your hands from going numb from overuse.

The smooth face of the hammer end is magnetized, which helps with getting nails started and keeps them straight on the surface. With a 16-inch handle, this hammer also offers better leverage for heavier strikes and allows you to get nails driven in with fewer swings. Any time you can get more done with less work, that is the way to go.

Who Should Buy It: Anyone who wants the best possible hammer available for their money and want to make sure that it won’t fail or break should consider buying it.

Best Hammer with Steel Handle

16 OZ Claw Hammer by HEIKIO
    This all-steel hammer is perfect for daily work like framing and roofing

      Pros:

      Cons:

Why We Like It: The 16 OZ Claw Hammer by HEIKIO is an excellent choice for people who want the most durable hammer available. 

Steel is a great option for hammers since it is virtually indestructible when it comes to how many times you can strike with it. The ergonomic handle is designed to be used frequently for long periods, which is essential for anyone serious about DIY.

Since steel doesn’t have much shock absorption, the handle is covered with a non-slip rubber, which helps take some of the edges off. The whole hammer is polished as well, so you’ll never lose it on a rooftop or job site.

Who Should Buy It: If you’re looking for durability and ease of use with your hammer, this is a good option.

Best Compact Hammer

8-oz. Stubby Claw Hammer with Magnetic Nail Starter
    This portable stubby hammer can be brought anywhere and offers enough usability for pro applications

      Pros:

      Cons:

Why We Like It: This 8-oz Stubby Claw Hammer is a perfect addition to any car’s toolkit or backpack. 

If you find yourself needing a hammer wherever you go, this could be a good option to take with you. The treated alloy steel head is durable enough to take on jobs but small enough to be brought almost anywhere.

It also features a slotted magnetic nail holder on the head to help you drive nails one-handed. The anti-vibration handle is meant to be as comfortable as possible, which is essential with any kind of portable tool like this.

Who Should Buy It: If you want a tool that is small enough to bring with you anywhere, this hammer is what you need.

History of Hammers

Thin Hammer on Planks
Image credits: Andrew George via Unsplash

Hammers are perhaps the oldest tool known to humankind. In our evolution, one of the most important steps was the creation of stone tools. The earliest stone tools were all hammers. Although some of the oldest hammers didn’t have handles, they essentially served the same purpose by having something that you could smash with a heavier element.

Archeologists have discovered hammerstones that appeared up to 3.3 million years ago. These primitive tools were likely used to split up smaller stones like flint and obsidian.

Around 30,000 BC, the hammer evolved into something resembling what we know of it today. A handle was added, which gave the user more leverage and made the tool more accurate to use. It also helped prevent injuries and accidents like broken fingers that were common with the earlier hammer stones.

In the bronze age, hammers began to be forged into a shape that we know today. After that, the discovery of iron and steel led to the creation of hammers that were stronger and could have handles fitted inside.

By the 1500s, people were beginning to understand some of the physics of what made hammers work. It eventually led to what we know and recognize as the modern hammer.

Common Types of Hammers

Hammer with Nails
Image credits: Anne Nygård via Unsplash

Since the hammer is such a common and simple tool, there is a wide variety of different types that have emerged over the years. Many times, these hammers are designed for specific uses and have been molded by the trades they are used for. It has resulted in some interesting tools that are very specialized.

Claw Hammer

Perhaps the most common type of hammer we know is the claw hammer. With a flat face and a claw on the end that is designed for pulling out nails and prying apart boards, this is a versatile and useful tool. They are also usually very light, which makes them perfect for taking up on roofs and out to job sites.

Ball Peen Hammer

Ball peen hammers have rounded faces and usually have two striking ends on either side. These hammers are mostly used by metal workers and are designed for intricate jobs that require a lot of control. The rounded ends can also be used to hammer out dents and imperfections in the metal.

Tack Hammer

Tack hammers are often called upholstery hammers because they are used with small brads or tacks. These hammers feature two flat ends with one magnetized side and one un-magnetized. It allows the user to start a tack easily and hold it in place with the magnetized end and then drive it completely in with the standard end.

Sledge Hammer

Sledgehammers feature long handles and heavy heads that allow the user to get a lot of power behind each swing. These hammers are designed to drive large stakes and items that need to be driven far into their intended target.

Different Types of Hammers
Image credits: Ernesto Velázquez via Unsplash

How We Picked

All of the hammers that we looked at are built from high-quality materials and are designed to last as long. When it comes to tools, longevity is one of the most important things to consider. Being able to rely on them and know that they will last a long time is incredibly important, especially if you do a lot of DIY work or if you’re a professional craftsperson.

We also looked for relatively light hammers. If you bring your tools out to a job site or up on a roof, you don’t want to struggle with them or have them be a hindrance. We included hammers that were under 2 pounds so anyone could handle them.

The Best Hammer in 2021 – Our Verdict

All of the hammers we picked are a good choice for people who need a good, high-quality tool for their toolbox. However, our favorite one is the Edward Tools Oak Claw Hammer for its simplicity, classic look, and durability. Plus, we love that if something goes wrong with it, the manufacturer will replace it free of charge. That kind of guarantee is hard to find these days.

No matter what kind of work you are doing, a quality hammer is an essential addition to your toolkit. By choosing a comfortable one that you can rely on, you can make all your DIY work much easier and more enjoyable.

Do you have a hammer that you love? Let us know in the comment section below, and as always, please share!

shares