Ego Mowers vs. Kobalt Mowers
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Ego Mowers vs. Kobalt Mowers

Ego and Kobalt are among the top electric mower manufacturers to emerge in the 21st century.

Ego was founded in 1993 and emerged as a cordless outdoor equipment brand that rivals the power and performance of gas-powered tools. Kobalt, launched in 1998, is the house brand of Lowe’s, the home improvement store. Kobalt lawn mowers are currently manufactured by Chervon.

In this guide, we’ll dive into the “Ego mowers vs. Kobalt mowers” debate and all related details. Read on to find out which mower brand better suits your own needs.

Ego Pros and Cons

A Power+ series self-propelled lawn mower by Ego, silver, grey, and black in color with bright green highlights.

Advantages

  • Equal power, or greater, compared to gas mowers
  • Weather-resistant and rust-resistant
  • High-performance brushless motors
  • Patented ARC Lithium-Ion batteries
  • 56V 8.0 Ah power sources
  • Lightweight steel decks
  • Peak power settings
  • Zero emissions
  • Cost less to operate and service than gas mowers
  • 55-liter to 70-liter collection bags
  • Advanced features like Select Cut and Touch Drive
  • Five-year domestic-use warranty options
  • Two-year professional-use warranty options

Disadvantages

  • Geared towards lawns under an acre in size
  • Requires extra batteries for extended mowing times
  • Not as well-known or established for as long as other brands
  • Only one type of power source is used in all Ego mowers

Kobalt Pros and Cons

A black and shiny blue Kobalt self-propelled electric lawn mower with two Lithium-Ion batteries and a charging station.

Advantages

  • Wide range of power sources including 80V, 40V, 13 amp, and more
  • Versatile run-times from 30-minutes to 80-minutes per charge
  • All-steel decks and heavy-duty components
  • Visible battery level indicator
  • Easy and upright storage
  • Super sharp blade tips
  • Speeds of up to 3.1 mph
  • Cuts up to 3/4 acres of grass on a single charge
  • Several dB(A) lower than gas-powered mowers
  • Easy manual adjustments
  • Up to seven height settings to choose from
  • Five-year domestic-use warranty options

Disadvantages

  • Less control over the self-propulsion system
  • Doesn’t handle really tall grass as well as Ego mowers
  • Takes up to 90 minutes for the battery to charge
  • Not as quiet running as many Ego mowers

Ego Breakdown

A silver and grey Ego lawn mower with a few vivd green highlights on the motor, levers, and hopper cutting tall grass in a big yard.

Engine and frame

Ego mowers feature both brushed configuration and brushless ones. That said, all of the newest models have swapped out their old brushed ones for improved 1,000W brushless motors. All Ego mower engines are powered by 56V Lithium-Ion batteries. Depending on the model, the batteries may be 2.0, 2.25, 4.0, 6.0, or 7.5 Ah. The motors and batteries in combination provide a run-time of slightly over or under an hour, dependant on the model you have. The frames on these mowers consist of steel and durable but lightweight composite materials.

Blade

The blades on Ego mowers, for the most part, consist of patented MicroCut Twin Blades. They provide such a precise cut that it actually helps your grass grow back healthier. Some models also include a Tri-Cut Blade that can be switched out for mulching purposes. The decks that house the blades are made of steel and composite material. They range in size from 20 to 21 inches. There are six height adjustments, allowing the blade to reach from one inch to four inches from the ground.

Pricing

There are quite a few Ego mower models on the market, including push, self-propelled, and zero-turn. Likewise, most of these mowers are available individually or in a package that includes an extra battery and sometimes a charger. The price for a walk-behind push or self-propelled Ego machine starts at around $350 and ranges up to $700. For a zero-turn, the price range jumps up to between $2,000 to $5,000. The prices include a five-year residential-use warranty as well as a two-year commercial-use warranty.

Maintenance

As far as maintenance is concerned, these mowers need very little; especially compared to gas models from other brands. Aside from an occasional wiping down, the only upkeep that you really need attend to with these machines is eventually replacing the blades and battery. So, no spark plugs, gas, oil, or filters to change here.

Longevity

Ego walk-behind lawn mowers of the push and self-propelled variety are rated for approximately five years of use. Replacing blades and batteries may prolong the lifespan. In addition, always mowing with a fully charged battery may help as well.

Kobalt Breakdown

A side view of a glossy blue and black Kobalt brand lawn mower with black hopper on a white background.

Engine and frame

Similar to Ego mowers, Kobalt mower frames are made of steel and composite materials. The combination allows for long-lasting and lightweight mower bodies. The machines are powered by robust brushless motors and Kobalt-brand 40V 4.0 Ah or 80V 4.0 Ah Lithium-Ion batteries. The average charge time for the batteries is an hour and a half.

Blade

Kobalt mowers feature dual blades of various sizes, depending on the model’s deck. The blades measure from 16 ins, for the smallest mowers, to 20.5 ins for the larger walk-behind models. They are designed to both cut grass and work for mulching as well. The decks are adjustable from 1.25 ins to 4.3 ins for precise mowing action. The blades are easy to install, requiring just one center-mounted bolt.

Pricing

The price for walk-behind Kobalt machines is a bit more varied than the cost of Ego mowers, ranging from $200 for the smallest and most basic model on up to $750 for the most advanced self-propelled units. The initial cost includes a five-year warranty for domestic-use, and sometimes an extra charger or battery. Also, you have an option to pay a bit more for an additional three-year protection plan from Lowe’s.

Maintenance

As with Ego, mowers the Kobalt brand produces typically take very little of your time when it comes to performing even the most basic of maintenance tasks. Sure, you may need to knock some grass out from under the deck from time to time, but aside from that, there is no real upkeep required. A battery change every year or two, as well as possibly replacing the charger is about all you’ll ever need to do. There is definitely no messy fuel or smelly fumes to deal with. Likewise, no oil changes or new filters are necessary either.

Longevity

Kobalt is no exception to the average lifespan of electric mowers; these mowers last for approximately five years. Mowing your grass before it is so tall that it makes the motor work extra hard, and operating the mower with a fully charged battery every time goes further than anything in extending that five years into six or seven. That said, replacing the blade with a new one annually helps as well.

Our Kobalt vs. Ego Mower Verdict

Both Ego and Kobalt make better products than the average run-of-the-mill electric lawnmower manufacturer, without a doubt. They both have their pros, cons, and brand-specific features that make them unique, and regardless of yard size, both companies produce a suitable model for your lawn.

But which one is actually better for you? That is a choice best left to you and your yard. We’re just here to provide all the facts necessary for you to make the best-informed decision possible.

Prefer an old-fashioned gas mower, but with a modern touch? Check out these Toro and Honda mowers that we recently reviewed. Or if it’s something that can handle an acre or more that you’re after, one of these small riding lawn mowers may be more what you have in mind.

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