Plants You Should Always Grow Together - Backyard Boss
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Plants You Should Always Grow Together

Companion planting is the practice of growing different plants together to maximize their growth and yield. When companion planting, it is important to choose plants that have complementary needs and benefits. For example, some plants may improve the soil quality for other plants, while others may repel pests or attract beneficial insects.

Here are some plants that make great companions:

Basil

Basil
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This fragrant herb not only tastes great in a variety of dishes but also deters flies and mosquitoes. Plant it next to tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and beans.

Thyme

Herb Garden - Thyme on the Rocks
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Thyme companion plants include cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. This herb helps to discourage worms and other insects from damaging these vegetables. Additionally, thyme can add a delicious flavor to many dishes.

Marigolds

Blooming Yellow Marigolds
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Marigolds companion well with just about any vegetable you can think of! These cheerful flowers produce a chemical that deters nematodes and other pests from attacking nearby plants.

Beets

why beet juice ice melt works - raw beets
Image credits: Tracy Lundgren via Pixabay

Beets improve the flavor of spinach when planted next to each other. These two vegetables also share the same nutrient requirements, making them ideal companions.

Rosemary

rosemary plant in outdoor garden
Image Credit: Kathy Byrd on Canva

Rosemary companion plants include beans, cabbage, and carrots. This fragrant herb helps deter cabbage worms, bean beetles, and carrot rust flies. Also, rosemary can add a wonderful flavor to many dishes.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtium on a garden fence
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Nasturtiums companion well with radishes, cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. These vibrant flowers attract aphids and other pests away from more vulnerable plants. Additionally, nasturtiums can add a peppery flavor to salads.

Carrots

organic carrots
Image credits: Gabriel Gurrola via Unsplash

Carrots go well with tomatoes, peas, and lettuce. When planted together, these vegetables can improve the flavor of each other. In addition, carrots help to deter nematodes from attacking tomatoes.

Onion

Freshly harvested onions
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Onions are perfect for growing with carrots, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. This pungent vegetable deters many pests, including aphids, Japanese beetles, and root nematodes. Onions also improve the flavor of many vegetables.

Cilantro

small cilantro plants
Image Credits: 家志 刘 from Pixabay

Cilantro companion plants include radishes, onions, beets, and carrots. This herb can help improve the taste of these vegetables when they are sown next to one another. Also, cilantro deters aphids from attacking nearby plants.

Squash

Raw butternut squash split open
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Squash companion plants include corn, beans, and radishes. These vegetables share the same nutrient requirements, making them ideal companions. Squash can also help to deter cucumber beetles and other pests from attacking nearby plants.

Garlic

fresh garlic
Image credits: Steve Buissinne via Pixabay

Garlic companion plants include roses, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. This aromatic herb deters many pests, such as aphids, Japanese beetles, and root nematodes. In addition, garlic improves the flavor of many recipes.

Dill

Dill flowers
Image credits: Sandra Alekseeva via Unsplash

Dill goes well with cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and kale. These veggies benefit from dill’s ability to attract predatory wasps that help control caterpillars and other pests.

Peppermint

Fresh bush of peppermint with lime on light green background
Image credits: Yana Boiko via Canva

Peppermint companion plants include cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. This minty herb helps deter caterpillars and other pests from attacking these Brassica vegetables. Additionally, peppermint can add a refreshing flavor to salads and other dishes.

Sage

Sage in a bundle
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Sage companion plants include tomatoes, cabbage, and carrots. This fragrant herb helps deter cabbage worms, bean beetles, and carrot rust flies.

Parsley

close up of parsley
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Parsley companion plants include tomatoes, asparagus, and corn. This sweet-scented herb can help to improve the flavor of these vegetables when they are planted next to each other. Also, parsley deters some root roundworms from attacking nearby plants.

Tomato

growing tomato garden
Image credit: Veresovich via Canva

Tomato companion plants include garlic, onion, basil, and parsley. These pungent herbs help to deter aphids, Japanese beetles, and root nematodes from attacking nearby vegetables. In addition, they can improve the flavor of tomatoes when planted next to each other.

Potatoes

red skin potatoes in a basket
Image Credit: Laura Ohlman on Unsplash

Potatoes companion well with peas, beans, and carrots. These starchy vegetables share the same nutrient requirements. Additionally, potatoes can help to deter root nematodes from attacking neighboring plants.

Spinach

freshly washed spinach in a collander
Image Credit: chiara conti on Unsplash

Spinach companion plants include beets, strawberries, and onions. These leafy greens benefit from the added nutrients that beets provide when they are planted next to each other. Also, strawberries help to deter nematodes from attacking adjacent spinach plants.

Radishes

winterradishes
Image credits: Matthias Böckel via Pixabay

Radishes companion well with cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. These heady vegetables help to attract aphids and other pests away from more vulnerable plants. Additionally, radishes can add a zesty flavor to salads.

In Summary

Companion planting is a great way to improve your garden’s overall health and productivity. By pairing plants with complementary needs, you can create an ecosystem in your garden that is more efficient and beneficial for all of the plants involved.

Have you tried companion planting before? What are some of your favorite combinations? Let us know in the comments below, and share this post with your gardening friends!

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